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Active Shooter Safety

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On April 30, 2019 two students at UNC Charlotte were fatally shot and four were injured when a 22-year-old opened fire on campus. Only a week later on May 7, 2019, a shooting occurred at a Colorado school resulting in one death and eight injuries. These tragedies are the most recent examples of the escalating trend of active shooter scenarios taking place across the country. Sunstates Security offers our heartfelt thoughts and sympathies to all those affected by the past week’s events, as well as the victims of all gun-related violence. We take active shooter preparedness very seriously and encourage everyone to have an emergency plan in place. Terry Hairston, CEO of Defend and Protect, Inc. recently presented a training session to Sunstates management staff enforcing the message that “You never know what you prevent, you only know what you don’t”. Let this be a reminder to have plans in place and know the best ways to respond if the situation arises. For the purpose of this blog, we’ll focus on three things: prevention, preparation, and best courses of action.

Prevention of Workplace Violence

Active shooter scenarios can occur anywhere, but often occur in the workplace. Key ways to help prevent workplace violence include fostering a respectful work environment and knowing the warning signs of someone who might be considering violence. Common signs include:

  • Increased use of alcohol and/or illegal drugs
  • Unexplained increase in absenteeism
  • Resistance and overreaction to changes in policies and procedures
  • Noticeably unstable, emotional responses
  • Comments about “putting things in order” or “getting even”
  • Increase in interest and comments about firearms, other weapons and violent crimes

The most important step in prevention is sharing information with management and/or law enforcement if you suspect anything suspicious about co-workers or unfamiliar visitors in your workplace.

Preparation

It is vital to have an emergency action plan in place and to practice the plan. People often think that an active shooter scenario will never happen to them. Unfortunately, violence doesn’t make exceptions for any person or setting, so it is critical to always maintain a high level of situational awareness. Create your action plan and focus on these components:

  • Preferred method for reporting fires and other emergencies                                                                                                       
  • Evacuation policy and procedure
  • Escape procedure and route assignments (floor plans and safe areas) NOTE: Always identify two exits in any facility or venue as soon as you enter
  • Local area hospital information
  • Emergency notification system that alerts employees, law enforcement, and hospitals

Action

An active shooter is an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill in a confined and populated area. In most cases, they are using firearm(s) and they have no pattern or method to the selection of their victims. If you are subject to an active shooter scenario, it is imperative that you assess the situation and decide whether to run, hide, or fight.

  • This is the most desirable option and is where your escape route and plan come in to play. Leave your belongings, keep hands visible to law enforcement, and follow instructions of police officers if any are present. Call 9-1-1 when safe.
  • If you cannot escape the environment, immediately get out of the shooter’s view. Close and lock doors, turn out lights, and put barriers between yourself and the shooter (desk, barricade, etc.). Silence your phone and remain quiet. If you can safely call 9-1-1, provide them with the location of the shooter, the number of shooters and a physical description, the number and type of weapons, and number of potential victims. Do not open the door or come out of hiding until law enforcement identify themselves and instruct you to do so.
  • Do this as a last resort if your life is in imminent danger. Act as aggressively as possible by throwing items, yelling, and improvising weapons. Most importantly, commit to your actions and be prepared to fight for your life.


Sunstates Security encourages everyone to take action against becoming a victim. Prevent, prepare, and act. Again, our thoughts and sympathies go out to all affected by gun violence. For more information on active shooter training and Sunstates Security, please visit SunstatesSecurity.com.

Written by Sunstates Security

May 23rd, 2019 at 7:16 pm

Ready, Aim, Fire (Risk Mitigation During Terminations)

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Called into a termination meeting, an Illinois man pulled out a handgun, fatally shot five co-workers and wounded five police officers. In Orlando, a fired employee returned later and fatally shot five employees before killing himself. A Los Angeles man, fired from his job at an auto parts store, shot and killed six co-workers before dying in a gun battle with police.

Terminations are almost always emotional. The key is to keep them from turning deadly.

Risk mitigation prepares for the “what-ifs.” What if the employee argues and threatens? What if the employee turns violent? What if the employee has a weapon?

Most human resources professionals are caring individuals. They’re not thinking about safety and security, but about treating the terminated employee humanely while following company policies and government regulations. But safety and security should always be a prime consideration when terminating an employee.

Best Practices During Termination

  • Place an experienced manager in charge of the termination, and brief everyone involved beforehand about the process.
  • Always have a witness to the event. In an ideal situation, assign two people—at least one of the same gender as the employee—to help defuse any potential issues. The best-case scenario also includes video surveillance in real time.
  • Position HR personnel so they always have an accessible escape route; they should never have their backs to the wall or otherwise be in a position where they can be cornered or blocked from leaving.
  • Post security personnel nearby, and provide HR employees with a way to quickly call for help, such as a code word or another discreet communication method.
  • Escort terminated employees off the premises immediately, preferably not back to their desks or work stations. Instead, HR personnel should box the employee’s personal belongings.
  • Use a third-party carrier to return equipment, so the terminated employee has no legitimate need to come back to the workplace.

HR personnel should be briefed on how to calm upset individuals. One common, and effective, technique positions the termination package as a carrot by making it contingent on employee compliance with the company process.

Employees should also be trained to look for red flags, even before considering termination. If any exist, security personnel should be placed on alert for an extended period. Terminated employees have returned to their former workplaces with a weapon weeks, months or even years later. Security personnel should receive as much intelligence regarding the terminated employee as possible, including a recent photograph, what vehicle(s) he/she drives, and what to do if the individual is seen in the area.

Terminating employees is a fact of life. Mitigating the risks when that becomes necessary protects everyone.

For information on how Sunstates Security can support your human resources department and other employees before, during and after terminations, please call 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

May 14th, 2019 at 3:43 pm

Safety in Faith-Based Organizations

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On March 16, 2019 dozens were killed in a New Zealand mosque terror attack. This served as an important reminder that whether it’s a church or religious educational institution, there is always a possibility of safety threats. Faith-based organizations pride themselves on being open and inclusive, so how do they draw a line when it comes to safety? Having proper security in place helps make that line a little less blurry and can deter and prevent threats.

Common Threats:

• Vandalism
• Burglary/Break-Ins
• Violence
• Armed Intruders

Churches and religious institutions should be able to focus on their mission: providing safe places for people to gather, worship, and learn. Sunstates Security helps our clients do just that by providing security professionals that are trained to identify potential hazards before they become incidents.

How We Can Help:
                                                                     
• Emergency Action Plans
• Vulnerability Assessments
• Education and Awareness Training
• Efficient Communication
• Patrol Services
• Concierge Services – a friendly face to provide information and assistance

Often, the mere physical presence of security personnel can deter threats. When that’s not enough, our security professionals will work with you to establish and implement practice response plans.

Unfortunately, security is not always a priority until something significant happens. Be proactive instead of reactive. Don’t let yourself be an easy target – utilize security and know the limits to your open-door policy.

For information on how Sunstates Security can support your security program, please call 866-710-2019 or email us at SunstatesInfo@SunstatesSecurity.com.

Written by Sunstates Security

April 24th, 2019 at 2:43 pm

How Technology Adds Value to Security Services

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The foundation of good security is good people, and that’s always been the focus at Sunstates Security. At the same time, we’re always looking for opportunities to help our people provide even more value. That’s why we partner with proven experts as needed and we employ the best technology to enhance and extend what our security officers are doing. This policy allows us to apply best practices from a wide range of industries to enhance client security programs.

“We apply the concept of ‘dog fooding,’ where you should never promote or sell something that you’ve never tasted yourself,” says Sunstates President Glenn Burrell, CPP. “We identify a strategic partner and use their product or service to better understand its capabilities and limitations so we’re able to advise our clients on whether it’s an appropriate answer to their problem.”

New Solutions for Common Problems
Some of the technology we use is behind the scenes: our clients won’t necessarily know we’re using it. Some is more client facing. We constantly review the available technological solutions and work with trusted partners to employ the best solutions on clients’ behalf.

• Proximity Readers and License Plate Recognition Software. Many facilities, such as corporate/school campuses and residential communities, have a high volume of both regular traffic (e.g., residents, students, employees, etc.) and visitors (e.g., guests, vendors, etc.) driving in. We know what systems can most efficiently read a tag or other device from the front of a vehicle as it approaches a gate, allowing quicker entry. Pairing such technology with license plate recognition software can confirm identity.
• Key Tethers. A key tether connects a key (or set of keys) with another device and provides an instant alert when, say, keys are detached from a belt. We often also attach a GPS tile to find separated keys. Clients frequently entrust us with the keys to their facilities, and we have a critical responsibility to take care of their keys, regardless of cost. Key control is critical to our clients’ safety and well-being.
• KnoxBoxes. Many property management clients have maglocks on their doors because they’re convenient: access cards can be easily programmed to control access for individual employees. But those doors will lock down in a power outage. While they can be opened from the inside, authorized personnel cannot enter the facility, even with an access card. We’ve found a solution by using KnoxBoxes, which uses a master key—available for security or management—to open those doors manually.
• Mass Notification Systems. We partnered with Punch Technologies to offer clients the Punch Alert emergency communication platform. The system allows individuals to report emergencies and safety hazards through a smartphone app. In addition, the platform permits two-way communication during an incident, so users can submit information and responders can issue mass updates.

We evaluate new technology constantly to find solutions that provide a higher level of security and convenience to our clients. Technology will never replace the eyes and ears of trained security officers, but it can help them do their jobs better every day.

Do you have a challenging security issue that’s keeping you awake at night? Contact Sunstates Security at 866-710-2019 or email us. We’ll help you find a solution.

Written by Sunstates Security

August 14th, 2018 at 3:54 pm

Gated Communities: Combining Security + Public Relations

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Security in gated communities presents challenges that vary widely from other facilities. These residential settings also require specialized skill sets and personnel that, again, are quite different.

For example, at a school or corporate campus, it’s quite obvious if someone attempting to enter has a purpose or belongs there. At many gated communities, the sheer volume and variety of   people seeking entry requires an equal blend of rigor and diplomacy.

Community Challenges
With residential communities, security personnel serve as both protectors and as public ambassadors. The open setting creates access-control challenges as officers decide whether or not to grant entry. As a result, officers must follow policies and procedures firmly and courteously, even though diligence might anger residents whose visitors have been delayed.

“Most people would say, that’s good. It shows they’re doing their job,” says Sunstates President Glenn Burrell, CPP. “It’s fine when it’s someone else’s guest, but when it’s your guest, it can be a problem.”

Depending on the size of the community, high volume at peak hours can affect the surrounding neighborhood. For example, many homeowners’ associations (HOAs) do not allow contractors to start work before eight o’clock in the morning. Larger communities may have 100 contractors waiting for entry, which affects public roads. Consequently, security officers need to be aware of what’s happening beyond their immediate vicinity.

In addition, security must enforce HOA rules and regulations, as well as standard procedures for safety and security. Diplomacy is an essential skill in such settings.

Community Best Practices
Based on extensive experience serving this specialized market, Sunstates Security has identified several key practices for meeting the unique needs of gated communities:

• Comprehensive procedures. Security personnel should have procedures, developed jointly with community representatives, for handling every conceivable situation, from background checks to emergency incidents. Such planning can help minimize common issues, such as visitor backlogs. In many communities, for instance, all guests and contractors must have prior approval, which includes background screening for vendors.
• Selection and training. The delicate nature of residential security demands personnel with exceptional public-relations skills. A discriminating selection process identifies individuals with the right temperament and attitude. Then, specialized training expands on core security skills to include gatehouse operations, community patrols, homeowner relations and diplomacy. First-aid and AED training prepares security personnel to respond to medical emergencies.
• On-site management. Having a dedicated manager at the community full-time helps align the security team with homeowners, property managers and other stakeholders. Such individuals have extensive experience securing residential communities, and they have the power to make informed decisions quickly and efficiently.
• Technology. Modern technology offers powerful tools for supporting the security function, while minimizing inconvenience. For instance, systems can scan and capture information from drivers’ licenses and compare that information to sex crime/pedophile registries. Other technology vets and processes visitors and issues temporary badges. New vehicle identification technology uses microwave RFID and semi-active transponders to identify residents and other approved vehicles. A more affordable option, tag or card systems on vehicles can speed entry for residents, while flagging non-residents.
• Two-tier authentication. While technology is indispensable for modern communities, those with automated vehicle-access systems need to heed the cautionary tale of the Trojan horse. Currently, most systems only identify the vehicle, not the occupant(s). The latest technology provides two tiers of authorization: the vehicle tag only works if an additional reader assigned to the owner is also in the car.
• Law enforcement liaison. The community security force is an ally of local law enforcement, and vice versa. Both groups should serve as the eyes and ears of the community and communicate regularly about incidents and potential threats. In addition, security teams need to monitor local crime trends and prepare for possible challenges.
• Resident resource. Hosting special events where board members and residents can meet security staff and managers has two benefits: it fosters trust and creates better relationships, and it allows security personnel to hear about and discuss issues and concerns firsthand.

To discuss how Sunstates Security can meet the needs of your community, please call 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

August 14th, 2018 at 3:53 pm

Managing Modern Threats with Protective Intelligence

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Managing Modern Threats with Protective Intelligence

Social media makes it easier than ever for like-minded individuals not only to find one another, but also to organize demonstrations for their cause. Consequently, more companies are calling on security partners for assistance in identifying and preparing for pop-up protests and other potential disruptions.
Technology can provide advance warning of such threats, but skilled human intervention continues to play a critical role in analyzing data and developing a sound strategy for risk management.

Sources of Intelligence
Advances in technology make security operations centers (SOCs) more affordable than ever, often providing in-house intelligence as needed. At the same time, organizations have other excellent information sources at their disposal for a fraction of the cost.

• Local partnerships. The same technology used to organize protests and other demonstrations also keeps the public informed of local developments. Many law enforcement agencies have email alert systems to notify residents of unusual conditions, such as extreme weather, vehicle accidents, and police activity. Most large cities have downtown alliances for businesses and other organizations that operate in these districts; information-sharing among members is an important benefit. In addition to these publicly available resources, private security teams should cultivate strong working relationships with local authorities, which encourage a two-way flow of information.
• Social media monitoring. Instead of relying on public alerts, more organizations are monitoring and analyzing social media activity, often through a partner with the tools and skills required to mine the raw data. Such monitoring efforts frequently fo-cus on a specific geographic area for a discrete period of time. For example, social media monitoring can provide real-time intelligence to support traveling executives and company events or to prepare for public reaction to current affairs, such as the student protests following the Parkland shooting.

Planning and prevention
Securing advance warning is only the first step. Managing potential threats requires more finesse than increasing the security staff in response to possible demonstrations.

• Staff management. While additional personnel may be required, a large, visible security presence may have the unintended effect of antagonizing protesters. Organizations should develop a strategy for making additional support available and ready to respond, without fueling already-high tensions.
• Building security. In some cases, it might make sense for an organization to go into lockdown mode and to prevent public access during a planned event. Even during a peaceful gathering, companies should have a plan for managing practical concerns, such as access control for employees and visitors and public runs on the restroom facilities.
• Training. Long before any potential threat materializes, security team members should complete training on non-violent crisis intervention. This specialized training teaches individuals how to defuse challenging situations before they escalate into crises.

To learn how Sunstates Security can assist your organization, please call 866-710-2019 or email us .

Written by Sunstates Security

May 1st, 2018 at 8:53 pm

4 New Year’s Resolutions for Security Directors

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4 New Year’s Resolutions for Security Directors

As we start the New Year, most of us have personal and professional goals to which we aspire. For security professionals, we recommend the following resolutions to help make 2018 a successful, uneventful one for your organization.

  1. Update and test the business continuity plan (BCP). Beyond the dangers of a national emergency, every organization needs a current, robust plan to recover from a crisis. In recent years, companies across the country have experienced disruption from weather emergencies. Advances in cloud computing and increasingly remote workforces are two developments that can have a dramatic impact on a BCP. The breakneck pace at which technology continues to transform business practices makes annual review and testing of BCPs more important than ever. Today, the plan should include procedures that apprise organizations of employees’ whereabouts—particularly when key personnel are traveling. Putting a plan on paper is not enough; companies need to conduct a tabletop exercise and drill at least annually.
  2. Establish (or enhance) an active shooter policy. Every company should have at least a basic policy that is communicated to employees. The U.S. Department of Homeland Safety publishes a guide that organizations can use as a starting point. In reviewing the active shooter policy, security directors need to keep in mind that the threat has increased. More shooters are forgoing handguns in favor of assault weapons. By the time police arrive, the assault is typically over. Contingency plans should include safe rooms where employees can retreat. In addition, organizations need clear guidelines regarding who closes and locks the door and when. Similar to BCPs, active shooter plans should also be tested annually with a combination of tabletop and live drills.
  3. Ensure vendor compliance with internal screening standards. Many organizations have strict background screening standards for their employees but don’t extend those requirements to vendors that provide contract or temporary personnel. As some companies have learned through repeated incidents and infractions, external partners may perform minimum screening to fulfill a vague contractual obligation. Outline the basic requirements for vendor background screenings in the security policy. At a minimum, service agreements should include this specific language. Preferably, the host organization should identify a trusted third party to ensure consistent screening standards for all on-site personnel.
  4. Perform penetration testing at key locations. While security protocols may appear iron-clad on paper, most are surprisingly easy to overcome. Resolve this year to put access control to the test: inspect perimeter fencing, check for blind spots in CCTV monitoring. Internal personnel can conduct preliminary testing, but organizations should consider contracting a qualified third party for unbiased reporting. Testing should focus on vulnerable entry points, testing the physical, human and technological aspects of the security program.

For information on how Sunstates Security can help your organization implement these resolutions, call 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

January 26th, 2018 at 7:40 pm

Security Operations Centers: More Accessible Than Ever

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Security Operations Centers: More Accessible Than Ever

As technology becomes more sophisticated, more affordable and more compatible, an increasing number of organizations are developing security operations centers, or SOCs, to support their security programs. In fact, Sunstates Security has partnered with companies to manage these command centers both locally and internationally.

Benefits of GSOCs
No longer restricted to spy thrillers and global mega-corporations, SOCs allow small-to-medium enterprises to leverage technology in expanding their security capabilities, while reducing headcount.

  • Universal protocols. Managing security operations from a SOC makes it easier for large companies to apply security standards across their organizations. Controlling access from a central location, for instance, reduces the need to rely on individuals to follow company protocols. SOCs can help ensure that every facility adheres to the same procedures and benefits from the same level of security expertise.
  • Improved asset control. Many companies use these centers to provide additional layers of asset control. Local employees are trusted to do the right thing, and technology provides verification. For example, some companies track high-value shipments with GPS technology. Geo-fencing the route sends an alert if the vehicle travels a specific distance off course, and SOC personnel can contact the driver and offer assistance, if needed. Similarly, SOCs can support employees traveling to high-risk countries by providing information on demonstrations or other incidents that could affect their safety.
  • Remote monitoring. Technology integration has significantly increased the capabilities of SOC operators. In addition to monitoring an airplane hangar, for instance, to prevent tampering with corporate aircraft, security personnel can interact with individuals on site. In some cases, SOCs have allowed the remote identification of intruders, who ultimately left the facility before causing damage. Other operators have witnessed medical emergencies and directed responders to provide assistance.
  • Real-time intelligence. Some sophisticated organizations have built briefing rooms adjacent to the command centers. If a major incident affects a company or one of its operating regions, executive teams move to the briefing room, which duplicates many of the monitors and other equipment in the SOC.

Additional Considerations
In developing and supporting SOCs for client companies, we’ve seen some common misconceptions. Frequently, organizations tend to overestimate cost savings from reduction in security personnel, while underestimating the risk of information overload.

  • Lower headcount, higher skill level. Beyond the expense of creating the SOC, these sophisticated centers require highly skilled operators with specialized training. Security departments are “doing more with less” in terms of personnel, but these positions command higher pay, better benefits and increased training. At some locations, for instance, operators complete between 80 and 120 hours of one-on-one training before they enter the SOC.
  • Less is more. Many organizations want to fill an entire wall with monitors, allowing command-center personnel to view more areas at once. However, operators can only absorb so much information. A more efficient practice is to support primary monitors with secondary monitors. If an incident occurs, the relevant images are transferred to the primary screens.

Thinking of creating a SOC at your organization? Sunstates Security can help you optimize a control center from a security perspective, in addition to arranging tours of active SOCs. Call us at 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

January 26th, 2018 at 7:32 pm

Looking Ahead: Emerging Trends in Private Security

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Working with clients in a wide range of industries across the country, we encounter—and implement—a number of best practices. Technology seems to be the common thread uniting many of these innovations. As devices and software become more powerful and affordable, more organizations are investing in systems and tools to make their operations more effective and efficient.

Following are some of the top trends we’re seeing in security, based on internal operations, industry resources and professional experience:

• Increased video surveillance. While the use of camera surveillance in the U.S. is much lower than in Europe, we expect this technology to become more prevalent over the next five years. Video footage has proven valuable in investigating incidents, such as the Boston marathon bombing and recent incidents in England, and Americans are slowly accepting—and in some cases expecting—the use of video surveillance.

• Central monitoring. More companies are looking for centralized command centers, known as Global Security Operations Centers or GSOCs, that can control multiple facilities from a single location. Previously, the technologies used for various security functions—such as access control and surveillance—didn’t communicate well with each other, presenting integration challenges for a single facility. New software bridges that gap and makes it possible for organizations to consolidate their security systems.

• Real-time security reports. Smartphone apps allow our officers to monitor tens of thousands of checkpoints each day in real time. This information populates our quality control system, which allows management and clients to review site information at any time. Improvements in efficiency may reduce the number of security personnel, while freeing members of the security team for more sophisticated assignments.

• Insurance discounts for security.  On the personal side, some insurance companies offer lower auto premiums for safe drivers, as reported by devices that monitor and transmit information about a vehicle’s operation: speed, following distance, braking intensity. It makes sense that commercial insurers will reward those organizations that have taken extra steps to protect their people and property with video surveillance, employee education and security teams.

To discuss how your facility can capitalize on the above trends in security, call Sunstates Security at 866-710-2019 or email us.

 

Written by Sunstates Security

June 27th, 2017 at 6:14 pm

Security Lessons from British Terror Attacks

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The recent attack near a London mosque marked the fourth terror assault on British soil in three months. These incidents demonstrate continuing trends in terrorism, with sobering security lessons.

Today’s terrorists have shifted tactics from well-organized, large-scale attacks to super-efficient strikes executed by small groups and individuals. This change presents the dual challenge of more potential attacks and decreased likelihood of law enforcement infiltration.

In addition, the attackers are methodical and smart, applying the same sophisticated planning as career criminals. Their ability to study and surmount security measures requires consistent creativity from protectors.

Challenges of Concentric Circles

For decades, law enforcement and private security have safeguarded property and individuals by creating multiple layers of protection, like an onion. This same approach is used for the White House and Buckingham Palace, as well as for special events, like concerts and award ceremonies. Each successive layer is more secure than the previous perimeter, with the greatest attention naturally focused on entry points.

“We’ve created our own security problem,” says Glenn Burrell, CPP, president of Sunstates Security. “These perimeters do a great job of keeping out attackers, but they create a secondary target.”

In addition, the May bombing at Manchester Arena revealed another weakness, changing the security game.

“Typically, few security personnel are posted at the exits,” says Burrell. “Now we have to think long and hard about managing exit strategies. For instance, we may need to create another perimeter at the exit to stop anyone from going in after an event.”

Additional Takeaways

Responding to this ongoing threat requires less reaction and more analysis, supported by training and increased situational awareness.

Understand the enemy. Security teams need to put themselves in the shoes of the perpetrators to detect and shore up vulnerabilities. These individuals prepare attack strategies. They study the protective measures in place and adapt their plans to minimize risk and maximize the impact. Security personnel should follow the same practice on a regular basis and revisit policies and procedures to curtail weaknesses.

Look for patterns. During Burrell’s service with Scotland Yard, he participated on surveillance teams that followed bank robbers for weeks as they conducted dry runs in preparation for a heist. Security teams need to watch for patterns and unusual behavior, calling attention to such individuals. This type of analysis allowed the FBI to thwart an attack against a Southeastern synagogue last year. The would-be assailants had been captured on camera and recognized during repeat reconnaissance trips.

Expand training and education. Both security and non-security personnel need to learn about the tactics of would-be attackers. The insidious and pervasive nature of this threat makes security everyone’s responsibility. Employees must also look for and report unusual behavior. Security teams, in turn, need to respond to, and communicate, with such informants to encourage such information sharing.

For information on how Sunstates Security can help your organization review and adapt its security procedures, please call us at 866-710-2019 or email us.

 

Written by Sunstates Security

June 27th, 2017 at 6:09 pm