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Safety Considerations During Social Unrest

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Safety Considerations During Social Unrest, Sunstates Security CompanyOver the past week, many cities across the country have experienced heightened social unrest, protesting, and rioting.  Some peaceful protests starting in daylight hours turn into violence and rioting after dark. These types of gatherings present potential safety threats to both people and property. Other challenges associated with mass gatherings may include blocked roadways, disruptions of business schedules, and dangers to individuals in uniform.

During times of emergency, Sunstates Security’s primary objective is to effectively maintain operations and safely staff client facilities. Outlined below are strategies the company implements to safely maintain our services during protest and riot scenarios.

Sunstates Security Emergency Response Measures

 Initial and Ongoing Communications:

  • Initiate contact with management team members and security officers immediately when any type of highly publicized event that has the potential to result in social unrest.
    • Put all local officers and emergency response teams on call.
    • Operations Managers to visit all sites in the area of concern to assess safety, provide direction, and continuous support.
  • Contact clients directly to advise of a potentially emergent situation, find out client-specific requests, and make recommendations regarding changes in coverage.
  • Continuous communication between managers, security officers, clients, and law enforcement to share the latest information and adjust coverage as needed.

Increase Staffing/Training:

  • All clients in affected areas may be advised to implement 24-hour coverage if not already in effect.
  • Recommend double coverage (at minimum) at all affected sites to ensure no officer is working alone.
  • Stay in touch with clients located outside of the immediately affected area to ensure we are responding to their requests for additional coverage.
  • Provide specialized training regarding risk mitigation and safe/appropriate responses to facility-related issues that may occur during the unrest that presents a risk to personal safety. Training is customized and documented through the Sunstates Learning Management System (LMS).

Scheduling:

  • Teams working in affected areas change to 12-hour shifts to minimize the amount of travel in and out of the geographic area of concern.
  • Adjust shift times from standard to accommodate public transportation schedules into areas of concern to allow officers the opportunity to get in place during daylight hours.

Officer Support/Safety:

  • On-duty Officers:
    • Continuous contact via phone, email, or on-site visit to obtain status updates and ensure safety.
    • Share information/answer questions.
    • Offer reassurance and support.
  • Scheduled Officers:
    • Contact officers via phone prior to their scheduled shift to discuss the following:
      • Ensure they have reliable means of transportation.
      • Brief them regarding on-going or anticipated action during their shift.
      • Share information about traffic delays or parking issues that may impact transit time
      • Offer the opportunity to arrive to work in plain clothes and change into uniform on-site to avoid drawing attention.

Technology/Equipment:

  • Utilize real-time reporting technology through a web-based platform to document tours, incidents, and activity with photos/videos.
  • Live video capability (i.e., FaceTime) with clients, managers, or other officers as needed.
  • Know the location and how to operate safety equipment such as fire extinguishers, AED units, etc.

Resource for Clients

Sunstates is committed to our clients and strives to serve as an information resource during difficult times. Following is a list of best practices to consider when preparing your contingency plan for dealing with protests or riots.

Best Practices for Facility Preparation.

  • Remove anything outside the facility or on the first floor/lobby that is not secured to the ground and could potentially be used as a projectile including tables, chairs, garbage cans, etc.
  • When locking down the building, be sure to include dock and elevators.
  • Be prepared to shut down the HVAC system in the instance that tear gas or other airborne chemicals are deployed in the immediate area of the building; should these substances get into the HVAC system, the entire building will have to be evacuated and decontaminated.
  • Recommend that a member of the building engineering team be on-site or available 24/7 as part of building an emergency response plan.
  • Be sure that all external security cameras are well secured and be prepared to share the footage with law enforcement.
  • Identify a safe place to park away from any action or plan to utilize public transportation. Do not park a vehicle in areas where action is anticipated and is likely to get blocked in and/or damaged.

Minimize Risk to Employees.

  • If possible, allow employees to work remotely.
  • Reschedule events for a later date.
  • Limit business hours to end early and allow travel out of the affected area before nightfall.
  • Provide training/guidelines on emergency response within your facility and the importance of situational self-awareness.
  • Maintain ongoing communication with employees who are remote or onsite during a violent scenario to provide support and direction, as well as ensure emotional well-being.

As your security partner, Sunstates Security is committed to the ongoing support of our regular security operations while serving as a resource to our clients for any emergency response requirements. The Sunstates Security management team is available 24/7 for our employees and our clients.  You are encouraged to reach out to your local contact if you have questions, concerns, or additional coverage needs or visit our website.

The Decade in Review and Looking Ahead to the Future of Security

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More skills and expertise, more training and knowledge, more technology. The 2010s saw profound changes in the security industry. The advancements, if anything, will accelerate in the decade we’ve just begun.

More Security Guards Than Police Officers                                                                                                                                                                                                             

As global threats increase, so does the need for security. In the past decade, the number of security officers surpassed the number of full-time, sworn police officers. By 2018, the number of police officers in the U.S. stood at 686,665, according to Statisa.com. By comparison, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported more than 1.1 million security guards and gaming surveillance officers during the same year.

That trend is worldwide. Many countries in the Americas, Europe and Asia report that they employ more security officers than police officers.

Not only will those numbers continue to grow, but the skills of security officers will become increasingly sophisticated. The security officer of the 2020s will have a greater understanding of using technology to enhance security capabilities. There’s no substitute for human eyes, ears and analysis, but augmenting humans with high-tech tools will be a major shift in the industry during the coming decade.

Technology: What’s Here, What’s Coming

When the past decade started, a minority of security employees used technology as part of their day-to-day duties. Today, the vast majority do.

Much of that is technology we now all take for granted, such as using smartphones to track patrol officers and to report incidents. Clients, too, are using more technology, because of a drastic change in the industry.

Specifically, there’s been a global move away from proprietary hardware and software to plug-and-play equipment, which is much easier to install, upgrade and expand. With new capabilities being added so quickly, systems and equipment go out of date within two or three years, and upgrading quickly and economically has become critical.

In addition, the coming years will see greater use of technology in three areas:

  • Artificial intelligence
  • Drones
  • Robots

What Artificial Intelligence Can Do

Artificial intelligence (AI) is rapidly adding more analytical and observational capabilities. It can be very expensive to have multiple human operators constantly monitoring the perimeter of a corporate campus to watch for a vehicle driven by a dangerous, disgruntled former employee. But AI can monitor and analyze the images from multiple high-resolution cameras in real-time and then alert a security officer if a vehicle matching the description is spotted.

AI can also, say, flag a vehicle that’s been spotted in an area where it shouldn’t be, or flag a suspicious vehicle that’s been seen in the same area multiple times over a short period. If the same person has been seen behind the building three times after midnight in one week, are they casing the facility and planning a break-in? AI can alert officers before the break-in occurs.

Many secure government buildings are already using AI to enhance perimeter security, and that same technology will be increasingly used in the private sector during the 2020s.

Drones on Patrol

Whether backed by human operators or artificial intelligence, drones can monitor every square inch of a campus, office park or other group of buildings much more efficiently than security officers on patrol. Drones can easily monitor areas such as rooftops that are difficult for humans to watch.

Drones can also be mobilized to quickly respond to any potential incident, providing high quality, real-time audio and video to security officers and others. They can be programmed to track heat sources or detect smoke to provide early warnings of fires.

The Human Touch

We have a logistics client who needs to ensure food safety. The client’s facilities process the contents of over 950,000 vehicles a year, and we employ advanced technology to ensure that every truck arrives in perfect condition, sealed correctly, so the client knows its contents are safe when the vehicle arrives at a grocery store.

Thanks to technology, our analytics shows that the number of potential issues has been slashed by almost 80%.

But humans will always be important and critical. Cameras and artificial intelligence can confirm that a seal is on a handle, but only a security officer can determine whether that seal is actually snapped closed. Trained personnel can spot signs of tampering and know what they’re seeing, while a camera cannot.

All of that means that human beings will still need to be an integral part of the security process. But over the next decade, security officers will be more educated, better trained, and more comfortable and familiar with how to use security technology. Clients will still want the human touch.

To discuss the impact of these trends on your organization, please call Sunstates Security at 866-710-2019 or email us.

 

Written by Sunstates Security

February 10th, 2020 at 8:38 pm

How to get the most from your security partnership

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How to get the most from your security partnership

In many organizations, managers aspire to certain perks. The corner office. The big desk. The fancy furnishings. Power lunches and high-level meetings where important decisions are made.

Sunstates Security managers are a different breed.

They practice project-based management, a simple idea that yields better service for clients. With project-based management, Sunstates operates more efficiently, provides competitive pricing, and delivers more hands-on service to clients.

Simply put, Sunstates security officers and managers go above and beyond every day. The results: Our client retention rate is 95%, significantly above the industry average.

With project-based management, managers spend more time out in the field, visiting client sites and talking to security officers and clients, than they do in their own offices. This has a number of advantages for clients and Sunstates:

  • It develops closer relationships between managers and security officers, as well as between managers and clients. Managers can listen to concerns, solicit suggestions for improvement, and make decisions on the spot.
  • It gives security officers and clients the opportunity to discuss concerns, issues, and suggestions that might not make it into a formal report, but are important enough to address.
  • It ensures that our employees follow the security plan that is custom-tailored to each client and site.
  • It provides opportunities to improve those plans, as well as other security policies and procedures, immediately on-site.

Those site visits and conversations can be fruitful. When a client mentioned that no one routinely checked fire extinguishers to make sure they were operational and up to date, we added that to our operations manual. Now, every fire extinguisher has a bar code and is checked regularly. When a client casually mentioned to a visiting manager that a door was defective (and replacement was delayed), we added an hourly check of that door to the duties of every patrolling security officer.

These minor items might have never been mentioned in a formal report. But they help make a facility and employees more safe and secure.

Best Practices in Working with Sunstates

When a Sunstates manager visits a client site, here’s how to take advantage of that visit:

  • Offer or brainstorm ideas for improvement to processes or services, no matter how small. We are always willing to learn new or refined processes.
  • Share ideas or ask questions. Ongoing communication is critical.
  • Point out items or situations, even temporary ones, that can increase safety and security.
  • Don’t feel reluctant to bring up any concern or issue; that’s why our managers are on-site.

Sunstates managers are trained to ask for suggestions and to recognize good ideas. Please take advantage of this opportunity to upgrade your security program continually.

For more information on how Sunstates Security manages on-site security, or for an evaluation of your existing security, please call 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

December 5th, 2019 at 2:54 pm

Smart Cameras, Smarter People

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Smart Cameras, Smarter People

New technology, especially security cameras with analytics features, are adding new capabilities and providing more reactive and proactive options. Today’s systems have capabilities previously seen only in the movies: pattern-based analytics, self-learning and AI (artificial intelligence) that can find security threats and suspicious patterns incredibly quickly and accurately. The new technology won’t replace security officers, but it will enable them to provide even greater security.

 

 

Spotting Potential Security Issues

Scenario 1: Looking Back for Clues

For example, you know a white van with green stripes was involved in an incident, or is suspected in an incident, on a corporate campus with 200 security cameras. Analytics software and a skilled security officer can find every instance that van was recorded by a security camera over the past few hours, days or weeks, typically in less than an hour. The security officer can build a timeline of the vehicle’s movements on the campus, as well as identify when anyone entered or left the vehicle.

Scenario 2: Looking Forward Proactively

Today’s cameras and software can also reverse-engineer that scenario. The security officer can use the software and camera system to be on the lookout for a white van with green stripes, and send an alert as soon as a vehicle matching that description is spotted.

If, say, a recently terminated employee is deemed a potential threat, and the security officer knows what type of vehicle that person is driving, the system can alert security as soon as that person drives onto the corporate campus.

Building and Managing a Complete System

Most importantly, software can now bridge different systems and different cameras from multiple manufacturers to build a complete, seamless system. Even older cameras can have the same capabilities as the latest generation, albeit possibly with lower resolution. Even if the images aren’t as sharp and clear, those cameras can still be an integral part of an early warning system, saving the costs of replacing equipment.

Cameras and Access Control

With facial recognition technology, the future won’t rely on keys, badges or card swipes, but on cameras and software that “recognize” employees and flag intruders and anyone not known by the system. This technology will be both more secure—an intruder could steal an employee’s badge or key card, but not an employee’s face—and more cost-effective.

The Human Element

Security cameras, software and other technology won’t replace security personnel. Instead, security officers will be more highly skilled in using that technology to provide higher levels of both reactive and proactive security.

For information on how Sunstates Security can combine technology with skilled personnel for a higher level of security, please call 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

September 10th, 2019 at 6:31 pm

Security by Design: Best Practices in Secure Environments

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Security by Design: Best Practices in Secure Environments

Most commercial buildings begin with an architect and a designer. Outside, a landscaper or landscape architect will usually be tapped to provide the esthetic surroundings.

Open floorplans. Glass walls. Lots of windows. Outside, beautiful plantings.

These features may be pleasing to the eye. But they also can significantly compromise safety. Security would be greatly enhanced by including a security expert on the initial design team.

 

The Four Aspects of Designing for Safety

There are four key elements to corporate security:

  • Access control, especially in shared spaces
  • Landscape design that emphasizes security
  • Interior design that mitigates potential threats
  • Security-minded policies and procedures

Element 1: Access Control

Access control can be challenging when a building or campus is shared by different organizations. But there are several best practices that can mitigate the potential for security issues:

  • Individual access control for each office or tenant
  • A centralized communication system, such as a PA, to warn all occupants of potential or actual threats
  • Building-wide access control, so only those who belong in the building can enter
  • Security systems or personnel that can flag unusual activity

Consider, for example, the auto mechanic who was terminated at a West Coast auto dealership after weeks of poor performance, threats to co-workers, and other red flags. He went to his vehicle, retrieved a gun and returned, killing two former colleagues before committing suicide. Incidents such as this highlight what many businesses are now following as a best practice:

  • Have employees park in a secure area with controlled access
  • Restrict employees from visiting their vehicles during the workday or monitor employees who do so

Element 2: Exterior Design

Parking areas, pathways and landscaping should be designed with two goals in mind: perimeter security and elimination of hiding places.

Perimeter security means establishing layers of security, typically with multiple checkpoints and many opportunities to spot potential security issues. Ideally, this strategy positions the initial access control so that a would-be intruder would be stopped before being able to enter or penetrate a facility or campus.

For landscaping, the key is to eliminate not only hiding places for intruders attempting to enter the building, but also places where someone could attack or otherwise harm employees and visitors heading towards or away from the building.

Element 3: Interior Design

The same glass walls and bullpen-type seating areas that give a space a light and airy ambience have a serious drawback. In the event of an active shooter or other incident, employees have nowhere to hide. Walls, offices and secure doors make it possible to hide from an intruder.

Employees have three options when confronted by an active shooter: run, hide or fight. Interiors should be designed to maximize all three of those options. In addition, entrances should have a holding area that can be secured to prevent an intruder from entering the inner offices.

Element 4: Policies and Procedures

None of these steps, of course, will effectively mitigate potential security threats without employee training in the proper policies and procedures to spot and react to security issues.

For organizations without an internal security chief, a security consultant that offers employee training can be an invaluable resource. Security training should be part of every new employee’s orientation, and refresher training should be mandatory and regularly scheduled.

For information on how Sunstates Security can use technology and personnel to provide greater security, or for an evaluation of your existing security systems and strategies, please call 866-710-2019 or email us.

 

Written by Sunstates Security

September 4th, 2019 at 3:22 pm

Commercial Property Class A Safety

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Think of the swanky downtown offices or high-rise apartments in your surrounding area. Chances are they’re what is known as a Class A property. Class A properties are generally newer
properties, well-located in the market and typically professionally managed. You may admire their size and architecture, but do you ever stop to think about the security that happens behind the scenes? It takes a special kind of security professional to perform the job well. They must interact well with tenants, cover a large area, and perform various duties. It’s important to be aware of common safety concerns and to pick the right security provider. After all, security professionals are a reflection of both their employer and the client.

Sunstates Security understands how important it is to acknowledge your organization’s culture and identify what is important in servicing your multiple levels of clientele: whether it’s your employees, visitors, or surrounding community. Security professionals working in these properties need to be able to balance a dual role. One component of their role is to serve as a public ambassador and provide the best experience for all tenants, contractors, and visitors. Security professionals must fulfill this side of the job while simultaneously ensuring that all property safety protocols are enforced.

Security professionals must cater to the public ambassador portion of the role in a multitude of ways. They are often responsible for greeting tenants (employees of the building, residents, etc.). They provide directions to guests, answer phone calls at reception, and more. Often, the mere physical presence of an officer while they perform their public ambassador duties can deter security threats.

The other component of a security professionals’ job in a Class A property is to monitor for physical security issues like “piggybacking” or “tailgating”, and maintenance issues. Piggybacking is when an individual enters the building directly behind someone who is authorized to be there, while they themselves are not. This could happen when someone swipes their access key to enter the building and another person follows through directly after without having their own key. Security professionals often are tasked with performing patrols around the building and on each floor to monitor for maintenance issues like water leaks and lighting outages. At Sunstates, our officers utilize electronic reporting tools that allow them to report issues like these as soon as they encounter them.

Given the duality of the role, it’s important you have security professionals who are recruited and trained to the highest standard. Sunstates has extensive experience hiring security professionals who can perform all aspects of this unique role. Contact us to learn more about our security services in Class A properties.

Written by Sunstates Security

August 20th, 2019 at 4:46 pm

Active Shooter Safety

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On April 30, 2019 two students at UNC Charlotte were fatally shot and four were injured when a 22-year-old opened fire on campus. Only a week later on May 7, 2019, a shooting occurred at a Colorado school resulting in one death and eight injuries. These tragedies are the most recent examples of the escalating trend of active shooter scenarios taking place across the country. Sunstates Security offers our heartfelt thoughts and sympathies to all those affected by the past week’s events, as well as the victims of all gun-related violence. We take active shooter preparedness very seriously and encourage everyone to have an emergency plan in place. Terry Hairston, CEO of Defend and Protect, Inc. recently presented a training session to Sunstates management staff enforcing the message that “You never know what you prevent, you only know what you don’t”. Let this be a reminder to have plans in place and know the best ways to respond if the situation arises. For the purpose of this blog, we’ll focus on three things: prevention, preparation, and best courses of action.

Prevention of Workplace Violence

Active shooter scenarios can occur anywhere, but often occur in the workplace. Key ways to help prevent workplace violence include fostering a respectful work environment and knowing the warning signs of someone who might be considering violence. Common signs include:

  • Increased use of alcohol and/or illegal drugs
  • Unexplained increase in absenteeism
  • Resistance and overreaction to changes in policies and procedures
  • Noticeably unstable, emotional responses
  • Comments about “putting things in order” or “getting even”
  • Increase in interest and comments about firearms, other weapons and violent crimes

The most important step in prevention is sharing information with management and/or law enforcement if you suspect anything suspicious about co-workers or unfamiliar visitors in your workplace.

Preparation

It is vital to have an emergency action plan in place and to practice the plan. People often think that an active shooter scenario will never happen to them. Unfortunately, violence doesn’t make exceptions for any person or setting, so it is critical to always maintain a high level of situational awareness. Create your action plan and focus on these components:

  • Preferred method for reporting fires and other emergencies                                                                                                        Image 1 for Active Shooter Safety Post
  • Evacuation policy and procedure
  • Escape procedure and route assignments (floor plans and safe areas) NOTE: Always identify two exits in any facility or venue as soon as you enter
  • Local area hospital information
  • Emergency notification system that alerts employees, law enforcement, and hospitals

Action

An active shooter is an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill in a confined and populated area. In most cases, they are using firearm(s) and they have no pattern or method to the selection of their victims. If you are subject to an active shooter scenario, it is imperative that you assess the situation and decide whether to run, hide, or fight.

  • This is the most desirable option and is where your escape route and plan come in to play. Leave your belongings, keep hands visible to law enforcement, and follow instructions of police officers if any are present. Call 9-1-1 when safe.
  • If you cannot escape the environment, immediately get out of the shooter’s view. Close and lock doors, turn out lights, and put barriers between yourself and the shooter (desk, barricade, etc.). Silence your phone and remain quiet. If you can safely call 9-1-1, provide them with the location of the shooter, the number of shooters and a physical description, the number and type of weapons, and number of potential victims. Do not open the door or come out of hiding until law enforcement identify themselves and instruct you to do so.
  • Do this as a last resort if your life is in imminent danger. Act as aggressively as possible by throwing items, yelling, and improvising weapons. Most importantly, commit to your actions and be prepared to fight for your life.

Image 2 for Active Shooter Safety Post
Sunstates Security encourages everyone to take action against becoming a victim. Prevent, prepare, and act. Again, our thoughts and sympathies go out to all affected by gun violence. For more information on active shooter training and Sunstates Security, please visit SunstatesSecurity.com.

Written by Sunstates Security

May 23rd, 2019 at 7:16 pm

Ready, Aim, Fire (Risk Mitigation During Terminations)

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Called into a termination meeting, an Illinois man pulled out a handgun, fatally shot five co-workers and wounded five police officers. In Orlando, a fired employee returned later and fatally shot five employees before killing himself. A Los Angeles man, fired from his job at an auto parts store, shot and killed six co-workers before dying in a gun battle with police.

Terminations are almost always emotional. The key is to keep them from turning deadly.

Risk mitigation prepares for the “what-ifs.” What if the employee argues and threatens? What if the employee turns violent? What if the employee has a weapon?

Most human resources professionals are caring individuals. They’re not thinking about safety and security, but about treating the terminated employee humanely while following company policies and government regulations. But safety and security should always be a prime consideration when terminating an employee.

Best Practices During Termination

  • Place an experienced manager in charge of the termination, and brief everyone involved beforehand about the process.
  • Always have a witness to the event. In an ideal situation, assign two people—at least one of the same gender as the employee—to help defuse any potential issues. The best-case scenario also includes video surveillance in real time.
  • Position HR personnel so they always have an accessible escape route; they should never have their backs to the wall or otherwise be in a position where they can be cornered or blocked from leaving.
  • Post security personnel nearby, and provide HR employees with a way to quickly call for help, such as a code word or another discreet communication method.
  • Escort terminated employees off the premises immediately, preferably not back to their desks or work stations. Instead, HR personnel should box the employee’s personal belongings.
  • Use a third-party carrier to return equipment, so the terminated employee has no legitimate need to come back to the workplace.

HR personnel should be briefed on how to calm upset individuals. One common, and effective, technique positions the termination package as a carrot by making it contingent on employee compliance with the company process.

Employees should also be trained to look for red flags, even before considering termination. If any exist, security personnel should be placed on alert for an extended period. Terminated employees have returned to their former workplaces with a weapon weeks, months or even years later. Security personnel should receive as much intelligence regarding the terminated employee as possible, including a recent photograph, what vehicle(s) he/she drives, and what to do if the individual is seen in the area.

Terminating employees is a fact of life. Mitigating the risks when that becomes necessary protects everyone.

For information on how Sunstates Security can support your human resources department and other employees before, during and after terminations, please call 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

May 14th, 2019 at 3:43 pm

Safety in Faith-Based Organizations

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On March 16, 2019 dozens were killed in a New Zealand mosque terror attack. This served as an important reminder that whether it’s a church or religious educational institution, there is always a possibility of safety threats. Faith-based organizations pride themselves on being open and inclusive, so how do they draw a line when it comes to safety? Having proper security in place helps make that line a little less blurry and can deter and prevent threats.

Common Threats:

• Vandalism
• Burglary/Break-Ins
• Violence
• Armed Intruders

Churches and religious institutions should be able to focus on their mission: providing safe places for people to gather, worship, and learn. Sunstates Security helps our clients do just that by providing security professionals that are trained to identify potential hazards before they become incidents.

How We Can Help:
                                                                     
• Emergency Action Plans
• Vulnerability Assessments
• Education and Awareness Training
• Efficient Communication
• Patrol Services
• Concierge Services – a friendly face to provide information and assistance

Often, the mere physical presence of security personnel can deter threats. When that’s not enough, our security professionals will work with you to establish and implement practice response plans.

Unfortunately, security is not always a priority until something significant happens. Be proactive instead of reactive. Don’t let yourself be an easy target – utilize security and know the limits to your open-door policy.

For information on how Sunstates Security can support your security program, please call 866-710-2019 or email us at SunstatesInfo@SunstatesSecurity.com.

Written by Sunstates Security

April 24th, 2019 at 2:43 pm

How Technology Adds Value to Security Services

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The foundation of good security is good people, and that’s always been the focus at Sunstates Security. At the same time, we’re always looking for opportunities to help our people provide even more value. That’s why we partner with proven experts as needed and we employ the best technology to enhance and extend what our security officers are doing. This policy allows us to apply best practices from a wide range of industries to enhance client security programs.

“We apply the concept of ‘dog fooding,’ where you should never promote or sell something that you’ve never tasted yourself,” says Sunstates President Glenn Burrell, CPP. “We identify a strategic partner and use their product or service to better understand its capabilities and limitations so we’re able to advise our clients on whether it’s an appropriate answer to their problem.”

New Solutions for Common Problems
Some of the technology we use is behind the scenes: our clients won’t necessarily know we’re using it. Some is more client facing. We constantly review the available technological solutions and work with trusted partners to employ the best solutions on clients’ behalf.

• Proximity Readers and License Plate Recognition Software. Many facilities, such as corporate/school campuses and residential communities, have a high volume of both regular traffic (e.g., residents, students, employees, etc.) and visitors (e.g., guests, vendors, etc.) driving in. We know what systems can most efficiently read a tag or other device from the front of a vehicle as it approaches a gate, allowing quicker entry. Pairing such technology with license plate recognition software can confirm identity.
• Key Tethers. A key tether connects a key (or set of keys) with another device and provides an instant alert when, say, keys are detached from a belt. We often also attach a GPS tile to find separated keys. Clients frequently entrust us with the keys to their facilities, and we have a critical responsibility to take care of their keys, regardless of cost. Key control is critical to our clients’ safety and well-being.
• KnoxBoxes. Many property management clients have maglocks on their doors because they’re convenient: access cards can be easily programmed to control access for individual employees. But those doors will lock down in a power outage. While they can be opened from the inside, authorized personnel cannot enter the facility, even with an access card. We’ve found a solution by using KnoxBoxes, which uses a master key—available for security or management—to open those doors manually.
• Mass Notification Systems. We partnered with Punch Technologies to offer clients the Punch Alert emergency communication platform. The system allows individuals to report emergencies and safety hazards through a smartphone app. In addition, the platform permits two-way communication during an incident, so users can submit information and responders can issue mass updates.

We evaluate new technology constantly to find solutions that provide a higher level of security and convenience to our clients. Technology will never replace the eyes and ears of trained security officers, but it can help them do their jobs better every day.

Do you have a challenging security issue that’s keeping you awake at night? Contact Sunstates Security at 866-710-2019 or email us. We’ll help you find a solution.

Written by Sunstates Security

August 14th, 2018 at 3:54 pm