Sunstates Blog

A Proactive Security Partner

Active Shooter Safety

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On April 30, 2019 two students at UNC Charlotte were fatally shot and four were injured when a 22-year-old opened fire on campus. Only a week later on May 7, 2019, a shooting occurred at a Colorado school resulting in one death and eight injuries. These tragedies are the most recent examples of the escalating trend of active shooter scenarios taking place across the country. Sunstates Security offers our heartfelt thoughts and sympathies to all those affected by the past week’s events, as well as the victims of all gun-related violence. We take active shooter preparedness very seriously and encourage everyone to have an emergency plan in place. Terry Hairston, CEO of Defend and Protect, Inc. recently presented a training session to Sunstates management staff enforcing the message that “You never know what you prevent, you only know what you don’t”. Let this be a reminder to have plans in place and know the best ways to respond if the situation arises. For the purpose of this blog, we’ll focus on three things: prevention, preparation, and best courses of action.

Prevention of Workplace Violence

Active shooter scenarios can occur anywhere, but often occur in the workplace. Key ways to help prevent workplace violence include fostering a respectful work environment and knowing the warning signs of someone who might be considering violence. Common signs include:

  • Increased use of alcohol and/or illegal drugs
  • Unexplained increase in absenteeism
  • Resistance and overreaction to changes in policies and procedures
  • Noticeably unstable, emotional responses
  • Comments about “putting things in order” or “getting even”
  • Increase in interest and comments about firearms, other weapons and violent crimes

The most important step in prevention is sharing information with management and/or law enforcement if you suspect anything suspicious about co-workers or unfamiliar visitors in your workplace.

Preparation

It is vital to have an emergency action plan in place and to practice the plan. People often think that an active shooter scenario will never happen to them. Unfortunately, violence doesn’t make exceptions for any person or setting, so it is critical to always maintain a high level of situational awareness. Create your action plan and focus on these components:

  • Preferred method for reporting fires and other emergencies                                                                                                       
  • Evacuation policy and procedure
  • Escape procedure and route assignments (floor plans and safe areas) NOTE: Always identify two exits in any facility or venue as soon as you enter
  • Local area hospital information
  • Emergency notification system that alerts employees, law enforcement, and hospitals

Action

An active shooter is an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill in a confined and populated area. In most cases, they are using firearm(s) and they have no pattern or method to the selection of their victims. If you are subject to an active shooter scenario, it is imperative that you assess the situation and decide whether to run, hide, or fight.

  • This is the most desirable option and is where your escape route and plan come in to play. Leave your belongings, keep hands visible to law enforcement, and follow instructions of police officers if any are present. Call 9-1-1 when safe.
  • If you cannot escape the environment, immediately get out of the shooter’s view. Close and lock doors, turn out lights, and put barriers between yourself and the shooter (desk, barricade, etc.). Silence your phone and remain quiet. If you can safely call 9-1-1, provide them with the location of the shooter, the number of shooters and a physical description, the number and type of weapons, and number of potential victims. Do not open the door or come out of hiding until law enforcement identify themselves and instruct you to do so.
  • Do this as a last resort if your life is in imminent danger. Act as aggressively as possible by throwing items, yelling, and improvising weapons. Most importantly, commit to your actions and be prepared to fight for your life.


Sunstates Security encourages everyone to take action against becoming a victim. Prevent, prepare, and act. Again, our thoughts and sympathies go out to all affected by gun violence. For more information on active shooter training and Sunstates Security, please visit SunstatesSecurity.com.

Written by Sunstates Security

May 23rd, 2019 at 7:16 pm

Ready, Aim, Fire (Risk Mitigation During Terminations)

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Called into a termination meeting, an Illinois man pulled out a handgun, fatally shot five co-workers and wounded five police officers. In Orlando, a fired employee returned later and fatally shot five employees before killing himself. A Los Angeles man, fired from his job at an auto parts store, shot and killed six co-workers before dying in a gun battle with police.

Terminations are almost always emotional. The key is to keep them from turning deadly.

Risk mitigation prepares for the “what-ifs.” What if the employee argues and threatens? What if the employee turns violent? What if the employee has a weapon?

Most human resources professionals are caring individuals. They’re not thinking about safety and security, but about treating the terminated employee humanely while following company policies and government regulations. But safety and security should always be a prime consideration when terminating an employee.

Best Practices During Termination

  • Place an experienced manager in charge of the termination, and brief everyone involved beforehand about the process.
  • Always have a witness to the event. In an ideal situation, assign two people—at least one of the same gender as the employee—to help defuse any potential issues. The best-case scenario also includes video surveillance in real time.
  • Position HR personnel so they always have an accessible escape route; they should never have their backs to the wall or otherwise be in a position where they can be cornered or blocked from leaving.
  • Post security personnel nearby, and provide HR employees with a way to quickly call for help, such as a code word or another discreet communication method.
  • Escort terminated employees off the premises immediately, preferably not back to their desks or work stations. Instead, HR personnel should box the employee’s personal belongings.
  • Use a third-party carrier to return equipment, so the terminated employee has no legitimate need to come back to the workplace.

HR personnel should be briefed on how to calm upset individuals. One common, and effective, technique positions the termination package as a carrot by making it contingent on employee compliance with the company process.

Employees should also be trained to look for red flags, even before considering termination. If any exist, security personnel should be placed on alert for an extended period. Terminated employees have returned to their former workplaces with a weapon weeks, months or even years later. Security personnel should receive as much intelligence regarding the terminated employee as possible, including a recent photograph, what vehicle(s) he/she drives, and what to do if the individual is seen in the area.

Terminating employees is a fact of life. Mitigating the risks when that becomes necessary protects everyone.

For information on how Sunstates Security can support your human resources department and other employees before, during and after terminations, please call 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

May 14th, 2019 at 3:43 pm

Replacing Security Personnel with Technology? Not So Fast

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Boots on the ground. Eyes in the sky.

As cameras, access controls and other security technology become more and more sophisticated, some companies wonder whether technology can replace personnel.

“We’ll upgrade our cameras, add a few to make sure the entire building is covered, then cut back on security personnel,” the thinking goes. “The payroll savings will pay for the additional technology in two years.”

But technology has its limits, and security vs. cost savings isn’t always a good trade-off.

What Technology Does Well

Cameras and security systems are getting smarter and more analytical. Backed by a command center with highly trained, skilled personnel (often former military), some aspects of security can now be accomplished with fewer people.

Well-trained experts can analyze camera feeds and other information and produce results quickly. Review the last 72 hours of parking lot activity to spot a suspicious vehicle? Note patterns that suggest employee theft or supply chain disruptions? Those are things that technology, backed by experts, does well in ways that human beings alone cannot. (Would several security officers, each working a different shift, be likely to collaborate and deduce that the same red Chevrolet has circled the parking lot several times but never parked? Not likely.)

The Downsides of Technology

Cameras, recorders and other security technology alone won’t spot suspicious patterns or activity. That analysis requires human intervention by highly skilled professionals. Former military personnel are good choices because they tend to have both the technical skills and the discipline. But training, especially training specific to a certain site or campus, takes time, and a good command center is an expensive and time-consuming undertaking.

There are two things that technology alone doesn’t do as well as security personnel.

  • Emergency response. Response time is critical, and the greater the threat or emergency, the more important that becomes. If the closest personnel are several buildings away on a large campus, critical minutes will be lost.
  • Public relations. Employees, clients and visitors feel safer and more reassured when they see professional security personnel. Reduce the number of officers, and employees often feel less safe. For visitors, first impressions are critical: polite, service-oriented security officers make an important statement about your facility.

Security technology can extend and enhance the security of any facility, whether it’s as simple as electronic locks that require key cards or a sophisticated network of cameras, motion detectors and a command center.

But technology alone, or security personnel alone, can’t provide as much protection and threat mitigation as the two together.

About Sunstates Security Command Centers

Sunstates Security manages command centers for clients across the country, ranging from single-campus systems to global operations.  With thousands of hours of experience, Sunstates can provide an in-depth analysis of facilities and security operations to seamlessly integrate technology and personnel.

The following tips are often overlooked when establishing a command center:

  • Provide redundant hardware and systems (including power) to mitigate downtime from equipment failure
  • Location is critical; choose a central, secure site separate from regular operations.
  • Employ “clean sheet” technology designed around the organization’s unique needs, and avoid proprietary hardware and software for greater flexibility.
  • Staff centers with highly trained, competitively compensated personnel to manage data and identify potential hazards before they become incidents.

For information on how Sunstates Security can use technology and personnel to provide greater security, or for an evaluation of your existing security systems and strategies, please call 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

May 6th, 2019 at 4:07 pm

Safety in Faith-Based Organizations

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On March 16, 2019 dozens were killed in a New Zealand mosque terror attack. This served as an important reminder that whether it’s a church or religious educational institution, there is always a possibility of safety threats. Faith-based organizations pride themselves on being open and inclusive, so how do they draw a line when it comes to safety? Having proper security in place helps make that line a little less blurry and can deter and prevent threats.

Common Threats:

• Vandalism
• Burglary/Break-Ins
• Violence
• Armed Intruders

Churches and religious institutions should be able to focus on their mission: providing safe places for people to gather, worship, and learn. Sunstates Security helps our clients do just that by providing security professionals that are trained to identify potential hazards before they become incidents.

How We Can Help:
                                                                     
• Emergency Action Plans
• Vulnerability Assessments
• Education and Awareness Training
• Efficient Communication
• Patrol Services
• Concierge Services – a friendly face to provide information and assistance

Often, the mere physical presence of security personnel can deter threats. When that’s not enough, our security professionals will work with you to establish and implement practice response plans.

Unfortunately, security is not always a priority until something significant happens. Be proactive instead of reactive. Don’t let yourself be an easy target – utilize security and know the limits to your open-door policy.

For information on how Sunstates Security can support your security program, please call 866-710-2019 or email us at SunstatesInfo@SunstatesSecurity.com.

Written by Sunstates Security

April 24th, 2019 at 2:43 pm

How to Prepare for an Active Shooter Scenario

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The news, unfortunately, is filled with stories about sudden, unexpected shootings in the workplace and other public spaces. One minute, people are going about their daily routines. The next minute: panic and chaos.

At concerts, in offices, in houses of worship, in schools and on military bases, an active shooter is a possibility. More and more, clients are turning to Sunstates for training and threat mitigation strategies. In conjunction with industry experts, Sunstates can help clients and our officers protect themselves and be safer.

“We want our clients to be safe,” noted Sunstates President Glenn Burrell, CPP. “I’d like to think that we can help save lives. That’s our focus and why we’re happy to provide that as an added value.”

Proactive Strategies
The best way to mitigate threats is before they occur. Sunstates security experts can help clients develop policies and procedures designed to prevent/reduce potential threats, including:

• Access Control. Monitoring and controlling who can enter a facility, or specific areas within that facility, is the first step to mitigating active shooter threats.
• Eyes and Ears. All employees should be aware of who belongs and who doesn’t in a facility or area, as well as who is acting abnormally.
• Preparation. Employees need to understand what to do if an active shooter scenario occurs, and they should regularly prepare and practice.

Client Training
Depending upon the clients’ needs, Sunstates can offer different types of training.

General Education. Sunstates can provide a high-level general presentation on the basic principles of Active Shooter mitigation training. We’d be happy to schedule a lunchtime presentation to help your employees understand threats in the workplace and the community, as well as what to do if the unimaginable occurs.

Advanced Custom Training. For more extensive and facility-focused training, Sunstates partners with industry experts to provide more in-depth training, customized to a client’s facility, employees and situation.

That education often includes the following:

• See something, say something. Employees should have established procedures to voice security-related concerns to supervisors and management quickly and efficiently, with regular feedback to encourage the flow of intelligence.
• Understand the plan. Managers and employees will be trained on the security plan, being aware of their surroundings and other critical factors.
• Communication is key. Before an emergency occurs, companies and facilities should have a communications plan in place. This review will examine current plans and make recommendations where appropriate.
• Know the strategies. In an active shooter scenario, there are three options: run, hide and fight. People should know how to choose their best option.

In many active shooter situations, the immediate response is confusion and denial. Many people will ask, “What is going on?” or say, “This can’t be happening. That was a car backfiring, not gun shots.”

The key takeaway for our active shooter training is to make employees’ responses automatic. Instead of thinking about what is going on, or even doubting that it’s really happening, we want “muscle memory” to take over and help mitigate or minimize the threat.

The bottom line is we want our clients and our officers to be safe, and providing active shooter training and education is a key part of that.

The time to prepare for an active shooter is now, and we can help. Please contact Sunstates Security at 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

January 10th, 2019 at 8:24 pm

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Quality Assurance: Consistent Support for Security Officers

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Sunstates Security has always focused on providing consistent, high-quality service. For clients, that means Sunstates officers are professionals they can count on.

Behind the scenes, what clients don’t see is the high level of training, support and oversight our security officers receive. With double-digit growth for the past several years, we’ve recently promoted one of our own to a new position: Ryan Moran, formerly Sunstates regional manager in Raleigh, is now the director of quality assurance. He’s been in the industry 18 years, starting as a security officer when he was in college, and he knows the demands that challenge clients daily.

His job is simple: to make sure we live up to our principles with every client, and to help managers and officers live those principles every day. He demonstrated that as a regional manager, managing the biggest portfolio of clients in Sunstates.

Sometimes he’ll be an extra expert, dropping in wherever he’s needed. Other times, he’ll be working with regional offices to help officers and managers continue to deliver the high level of professionalism our clients expect.

“What better person to have in the quality assurance position than someone who knows what to look for?” said Sunstates President Glenn Burrell, CPP. “He knows our system so well, and he knows and embraces the Sunstates culture.”

Here’s what to expect with this new role and resource:

• More support. The expanding quality assurance program will help managers and officers collaborate and support each other.
• More services. We’ll continually add new ways to support our clients, such as site vulnerability assessments and other services.
• More customization. We will expand on our custom quality-assurance checks for specific sites, to ensure we always do what we say we’re going to do.
• More sharing. With Ryan’s new position, we’ll be better able to share insights, strategies and best practices among multiple regions.
• More communications. Ryan will be another point of contact and resource when needed for our clients.

The Game of Work
Every manager at Sunstates receives a book called The Game of Work. The main principle of the book embodies our philosophy: work should be fun, and work teams should succeed together as sports teams do.

Great teams work together: All members know the plan and their role in it. And everyone knows the critical measurements that define success for their team. Those Key Performance Indicators, or KPIs, vary by client and region. Our quality assurance initiative will help you identify and achieve the ones that are more important for you and your team.

What Clients Will See
With so much of what we do going on behind the scenes, how will quality assurance help our clients?

The answer comes from a long-time client, who’s been with Sunstates for 20 years. He said he’s never considered going anywhere else because we’ve consistently given him the same high level of service since day one.

“We always want to make sure that we’re doing what we say we are going to do,” said Ryan Moran, Director of Quality Assurance. “It takes oversight to make sure that’s happening.”

We value the trust our clients have in Sunstates, and we always want to live up to that trust. By leveraging Ryan’s operational expertise, we can continue to provide outstanding service to our clients, and continue to support Sunstates’ officers and managers as they provide that service.

Do you want to know what Sunstates’ quality assurance will mean for you and your site? Please contact Sunstates Security at 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

January 10th, 2019 at 8:19 pm

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How Technology Adds Value to Security Services

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The foundation of good security is good people, and that’s always been the focus at Sunstates Security. At the same time, we’re always looking for opportunities to help our people provide even more value. That’s why we partner with proven experts as needed and we employ the best technology to enhance and extend what our security officers are doing. This policy allows us to apply best practices from a wide range of industries to enhance client security programs.

“We apply the concept of ‘dog fooding,’ where you should never promote or sell something that you’ve never tasted yourself,” says Sunstates President Glenn Burrell, CPP. “We identify a strategic partner and use their product or service to better understand its capabilities and limitations so we’re able to advise our clients on whether it’s an appropriate answer to their problem.”

New Solutions for Common Problems
Some of the technology we use is behind the scenes: our clients won’t necessarily know we’re using it. Some is more client facing. We constantly review the available technological solutions and work with trusted partners to employ the best solutions on clients’ behalf.

• Proximity Readers and License Plate Recognition Software. Many facilities, such as corporate/school campuses and residential communities, have a high volume of both regular traffic (e.g., residents, students, employees, etc.) and visitors (e.g., guests, vendors, etc.) driving in. We know what systems can most efficiently read a tag or other device from the front of a vehicle as it approaches a gate, allowing quicker entry. Pairing such technology with license plate recognition software can confirm identity.
• Key Tethers. A key tether connects a key (or set of keys) with another device and provides an instant alert when, say, keys are detached from a belt. We often also attach a GPS tile to find separated keys. Clients frequently entrust us with the keys to their facilities, and we have a critical responsibility to take care of their keys, regardless of cost. Key control is critical to our clients’ safety and well-being.
• KnoxBoxes. Many property management clients have maglocks on their doors because they’re convenient: access cards can be easily programmed to control access for individual employees. But those doors will lock down in a power outage. While they can be opened from the inside, authorized personnel cannot enter the facility, even with an access card. We’ve found a solution by using KnoxBoxes, which uses a master key—available for security or management—to open those doors manually.
• Mass Notification Systems. We partnered with Punch Technologies to offer clients the Punch Alert emergency communication platform. The system allows individuals to report emergencies and safety hazards through a smartphone app. In addition, the platform permits two-way communication during an incident, so users can submit information and responders can issue mass updates.

We evaluate new technology constantly to find solutions that provide a higher level of security and convenience to our clients. Technology will never replace the eyes and ears of trained security officers, but it can help them do their jobs better every day.

Do you have a challenging security issue that’s keeping you awake at night? Contact Sunstates Security at 866-710-2019 or email us. We’ll help you find a solution.

Written by Sunstates Security

August 14th, 2018 at 3:54 pm

Gated Communities: Combining Security + Public Relations

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Security in gated communities presents challenges that vary widely from other facilities. These residential settings also require specialized skill sets and personnel that, again, are quite different.

For example, at a school or corporate campus, it’s quite obvious if someone attempting to enter has a purpose or belongs there. At many gated communities, the sheer volume and variety of   people seeking entry requires an equal blend of rigor and diplomacy.

Community Challenges
With residential communities, security personnel serve as both protectors and as public ambassadors. The open setting creates access-control challenges as officers decide whether or not to grant entry. As a result, officers must follow policies and procedures firmly and courteously, even though diligence might anger residents whose visitors have been delayed.

“Most people would say, that’s good. It shows they’re doing their job,” says Sunstates President Glenn Burrell, CPP. “It’s fine when it’s someone else’s guest, but when it’s your guest, it can be a problem.”

Depending on the size of the community, high volume at peak hours can affect the surrounding neighborhood. For example, many homeowners’ associations (HOAs) do not allow contractors to start work before eight o’clock in the morning. Larger communities may have 100 contractors waiting for entry, which affects public roads. Consequently, security officers need to be aware of what’s happening beyond their immediate vicinity.

In addition, security must enforce HOA rules and regulations, as well as standard procedures for safety and security. Diplomacy is an essential skill in such settings.

Community Best Practices
Based on extensive experience serving this specialized market, Sunstates Security has identified several key practices for meeting the unique needs of gated communities:

• Comprehensive procedures. Security personnel should have procedures, developed jointly with community representatives, for handling every conceivable situation, from background checks to emergency incidents. Such planning can help minimize common issues, such as visitor backlogs. In many communities, for instance, all guests and contractors must have prior approval, which includes background screening for vendors.
• Selection and training. The delicate nature of residential security demands personnel with exceptional public-relations skills. A discriminating selection process identifies individuals with the right temperament and attitude. Then, specialized training expands on core security skills to include gatehouse operations, community patrols, homeowner relations and diplomacy. First-aid and AED training prepares security personnel to respond to medical emergencies.
• On-site management. Having a dedicated manager at the community full-time helps align the security team with homeowners, property managers and other stakeholders. Such individuals have extensive experience securing residential communities, and they have the power to make informed decisions quickly and efficiently.
• Technology. Modern technology offers powerful tools for supporting the security function, while minimizing inconvenience. For instance, systems can scan and capture information from drivers’ licenses and compare that information to sex crime/pedophile registries. Other technology vets and processes visitors and issues temporary badges. New vehicle identification technology uses microwave RFID and semi-active transponders to identify residents and other approved vehicles. A more affordable option, tag or card systems on vehicles can speed entry for residents, while flagging non-residents.
• Two-tier authentication. While technology is indispensable for modern communities, those with automated vehicle-access systems need to heed the cautionary tale of the Trojan horse. Currently, most systems only identify the vehicle, not the occupant(s). The latest technology provides two tiers of authorization: the vehicle tag only works if an additional reader assigned to the owner is also in the car.
• Law enforcement liaison. The community security force is an ally of local law enforcement, and vice versa. Both groups should serve as the eyes and ears of the community and communicate regularly about incidents and potential threats. In addition, security teams need to monitor local crime trends and prepare for possible challenges.
• Resident resource. Hosting special events where board members and residents can meet security staff and managers has two benefits: it fosters trust and creates better relationships, and it allows security personnel to hear about and discuss issues and concerns firsthand.

To discuss how Sunstates Security can meet the needs of your community, please call 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

August 14th, 2018 at 3:53 pm

4 Steps for Strengthening School Security

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4 Steps for Strengthening School Security

The February 2018 shooting in Parkland, Fla., provided a tragic reminder that schools and other soft target need to strengthen
security against active shooter threats. Clearly it would be impractical—if not impossible—to fortify campuses with a ring of steel, and arming teachers and staff is not a feasible solution. It seems equally unlikely  that the United States would follow the footsteps of UK legislators, who outlawed the purchase and possession of handguns after the 1996 massacre in Dunblane, Scotland, when a gunman killed 16 first graders and their teacher.

Despite the inherent challenges of school safety and the political minefield of gun control, schools can take several steps to mitigate their vulnerability. The following recommendations combine best practices from law enforcement and private security, as well as lessons learned from recent attacks.

• Counter-surveillance. Most prospective attackers have done a dry run or know the school well enough to  determine whether an attack will succeed. To identify such reconnaissance efforts, schools need to have trained security personnel—either law enforcement or private security officers—who can observe activities on and around the campus, supported by live video surveillance. While many schools have security cameras, these devices are often used as an investigative tool. Skilled personnel need to monitor these feeds in real time to spot suspicious behavior.
• Intelligence gathering. Often, collecting intelligence proves more effective than beefing up security. This proactive approach focuses on averting a potential incident, rather than improving response efforts. In addition to maintaining open, two-way communication with local law enforcement, security teams should encourage frequent meetings with teachers and staff. Rumors often become reality, as was the case in the Parkland attack, when the FBI received a tip about the suspected shooter one month before the assault. Schools need to cultivate an environment where students feel comfortable approaching teachers and security professionals with concerns.
• Intervention. Schools also need to have an intervention plan for managing potential threats. Installation of high-security doors, for instance, can buy time against a would-be attacker, while teachers and students retreat to a safe room and alert law enforcement. In addition, use of assault weapons raises the stakes—and the requirements of safe rooms. Such spaces should be designed to withstand 15-20 minutes of concerted attack.
• Flexible training. Even though faculty, administration and students at the Parkland high school had undergone “active shooter training,” the gunman—a former student who was familiar with the emergency plans—nullified that preparation by triggering the fire alarm. Over-reliance on any one response method, including lockdowns and sheltering in place, is less effective than teaching students and staff how to think for themselves.

For information on how Sunstates Security can support your emergency response preparation and training, please call 866-710-2019 or email us.

Written by Sunstates Security

May 1st, 2018 at 9:12 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Managing Modern Threats with Protective Intelligence

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Managing Modern Threats with Protective Intelligence

Social media makes it easier than ever for like-minded individuals not only to find one another, but also to organize demonstrations for their cause. Consequently, more companies are calling on security partners for assistance in identifying and preparing for pop-up protests and other potential disruptions.
Technology can provide advance warning of such threats, but skilled human intervention continues to play a critical role in analyzing data and developing a sound strategy for risk management.

Sources of Intelligence
Advances in technology make security operations centers (SOCs) more affordable than ever, often providing in-house intelligence as needed. At the same time, organizations have other excellent information sources at their disposal for a fraction of the cost.

• Local partnerships. The same technology used to organize protests and other demonstrations also keeps the public informed of local developments. Many law enforcement agencies have email alert systems to notify residents of unusual conditions, such as extreme weather, vehicle accidents, and police activity. Most large cities have downtown alliances for businesses and other organizations that operate in these districts; information-sharing among members is an important benefit. In addition to these publicly available resources, private security teams should cultivate strong working relationships with local authorities, which encourage a two-way flow of information.
• Social media monitoring. Instead of relying on public alerts, more organizations are monitoring and analyzing social media activity, often through a partner with the tools and skills required to mine the raw data. Such monitoring efforts frequently fo-cus on a specific geographic area for a discrete period of time. For example, social media monitoring can provide real-time intelligence to support traveling executives and company events or to prepare for public reaction to current affairs, such as the student protests following the Parkland shooting.

Planning and prevention
Securing advance warning is only the first step. Managing potential threats requires more finesse than increasing the security staff in response to possible demonstrations.

• Staff management. While additional personnel may be required, a large, visible security presence may have the unintended effect of antagonizing protesters. Organizations should develop a strategy for making additional support available and ready to respond, without fueling already-high tensions.
• Building security. In some cases, it might make sense for an organization to go into lockdown mode and to prevent public access during a planned event. Even during a peaceful gathering, companies should have a plan for managing practical concerns, such as access control for employees and visitors and public runs on the restroom facilities.
• Training. Long before any potential threat materializes, security team members should complete training on non-violent crisis intervention. This specialized training teaches individuals how to defuse challenging situations before they escalate into crises.

To learn how Sunstates Security can assist your organization, please call 866-710-2019 or email us .

Written by Sunstates Security

May 1st, 2018 at 8:53 pm